Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Antibiotic Use


When Do You Really Need An Antibiotic?

The fear of overusing antibiotics—and creating bacteria resistant to treatment—is legitimate: These drugs should only be taken to treat actual bacterial infections, such as strep throat, not for common viral illnesses such as colds and the flu. Don't push for antibiotic therapy, and if your doctor offers a prescription, ask if you really need it. According to one recent study, more than 25% of all outpatient antibiotic prescriptions for respiratory conditions are entirely unnecessary, and that is a conservative estimate. With mild infections, try waiting a day or 2 to see if you get better on your own, provided your doctor agrees. Any worsening of symptoms should prompt a call or visit to the doctor, at which time antibiotics may be started, but often the body heals itself, especially if the cause is viral.
Focus on ways to help manage bothersome symptoms that don’t require prescription drug therapy, such as staying hydrated and getting adequate rest. Of course, prevention is the best medicine. Don't smoke, eat a satisfying healthy diet, stay physically active, manage your stress well, and aim to get at least 7 hours of sleep each night. Get the annual flu vaccine, and during cold season be sure to wash your hands frequently. To learn more about the proper use of antibiotics visit the CDC's online Get Smart About Antibiotics Program.

Definitely don't self-diagnose and order antibiotics online or take leftover or another person's antibiotic pills—you may do more harm than good, both personally by disrupting your body's balance of "good" and "bad" bacteria, risking allergic reactions and more, and community-wide by contributing towards antibiotic resistance. (Learn how to hack your gut bacteria for faster-than-ever weight loss with The Good Gut Diet.)
If you are sick enough to consider the need for an antibiotic then you are sick enough to speak with your doctor, who should help make the decision about whether or not prescription antibiotic therapy is really necessary. Use other forms of antibiotic therapy like ointments or eye drops only as directed, and complete the full course of pills you are prescribed.

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

BLood Clots

Click on the following link to view a video to prevent blood clots while flying




http://www.msn.com/en-us/video/travel/how-to-prevent-blood-clots-while-flying/vi-76a56ec2-dfb5-4424-b0d8-2f5f6d7ff0cd

Monday, August 19, 2013

Hospice and Palliative Care

Do you have questions about Palliative Care or Hospice?   Deborah Popp LPN,MBM , Clinical Specialist in education and outreach for the Center for Hospice and Palliative Care will be available at the office every Tuesday from 9:00am-11:00. She will be available to answer your questions and can provide education and support in discussing Advanced Directives and goals of care when faced with or preparing for serious or progressing illnesses.

Friday, January 4, 2013

The Common Cold

Overview


Children and adults with viral infections, which antibiotics cannot treat, usually recover when the illness has run its course. Colds, a type of viral infection, can last for up to two weeks. You should keep your healthcare provider informed if your or your child’s illness gets worse or lasts longer than expected. Over-the-counter medicines may help relieve some symptoms.

How to Feel Better

What can I do to feel better if antibiotics won’t treat my illness because it’s caused by a virus?

For upper respiratory infections, such as sore throats, ear infections, sinus infections, colds, and bronchitis, try the following:

•Get plenty of rest
•Drink plenty of fluids
•Use a clean humidifier or cool mist vaporizer
•Avoid smoking, second-hand smoke, and other pollutants (airborne chemicals or irritants)
•Take acetaminophen, ibuprofen or naproxen to relieve pain or fever (read about what is safe to give your child)

For children and adults, over-the-counter pain relievers, decongestants and saline nasal sprays may help relieve some symptoms. Remember, always use over-the-counter products as directed. Many over-the-counter products are not recommended for children younger than certain ages.

Over-the-counter medicines may help relieve symptoms such as runny nose, congestion, fever and aches, but they do not shorten the length of time you or your child is sick.

Learn more by reading below about over-the-counter medicines. Here are some helpful tips for how to feel better depending on how you or your child feels.
Sore Throat

•Soothe a sore throat with ice chips, sore throat spray, or lozenges (do not give lozenges to young children)
•Use a clean humidifier or cool mist vaporizer
•Take acetaminophen, ibuprofen or naproxen to relieve pain or fever (read about what is safe to give your child)

Ear Pain

•Put a warm moist cloth over the ear that hurts
•Take acetaminophen, ibuprofen or naproxen to relieve pain or fever (read about what is safe to give your child)

Runny Nose

•Use a decongestant or saline nasal spray to help relieve nasal symptoms (read about what is safe to give your child)
Sinus Pain/Pressure

•Put a warm compress over the nose and forehead to help relieve sinus pressure
•Use a decongestant or saline nasal spray
•Breathe in steam from a bowl of hot water or shower
•Take acetaminophen, ibuprofen or naproxen to relieve pain or fever (read about what is safe to give your child)

Cough

•Use a clean humidifier or cool mist vaporizer or breathe in steam from a bowl of hot water or shower (read about what is safe to give your child)


Over-the-Counter (OTC) Medicines

For children and adults, over-the-counter pain relievers, decongestants and saline nasal sprays may help relieve some symptoms. Remember, always use over-the-counter products as directed. Not all products are recommended for children younger than certain ages. Overuse and misuse of OTC cough and cold medicines in young children can result in serious and potentially life-threatening side effects.
These medicines may help relieve symptoms such as runny nose, congestion, fever and aches, but they do not shorten the length of time you or your child is sick.

More information is available about pain relievers (National Institutes of Health), decongestants (American Academy of Family Physicians), nasal wash treatment (National Jewish Health), and humidifiers (Humidifier Health).

Questions and Answers for Parents about Over-the-Counter (OTC) Medicines

For adults, over-the-counter pain relievers, decongestants and saline nasal sprays may help relieve some symptoms. Remember, always use over-the-counter products as directed.

For children, over-the-counter pain relievers, decongestants and saline nasal sprays may help relieve some symptoms. Not all products are recommended for children of certain ages.

These medicines may help relieve symptoms such as runny nose, congestion, fever and aches, but they do not shorten the length of time you or your child is sick.

Q: What pain relievers can I give my child?

A: For babies 6 months of age or younger, parents should only give acetaminophen for pain relief. For a child 6 months of age or older, either acetaminophen or ibuprofen can be given for pain relief. Be sure to ask your child’s healthcare provider for the right dosage for your child’s age and size. Do not give aspirin to your child because of Reye's syndrome, a rare but very serious illness that harms the liver and brain. Learn more about Reye’s syndrome.

Q: Should parents give cough and cold medicines to young children?

A: The Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA), a group that represents most of the makers of nonprescription over-the-counter (OTC) cough and cold medicines, recommends that these products not be used in children under 4 years of age. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) supports this recommendation. Overuse and misuse of OTC cough and cold medicines in young children can result in serious and potentially life-threatening side effects.


Q: What can parents do to help their children feel better if they are too young to take cough and cold medicines or the healthcare provider advises against using them?

A: Parents might consider clearing nasal congestion in infants with a rubber suction bulb. Also, a stuffy nose can be relieved with saline nose drops or a clean humidified or cool-mist vaporizer.

Q: Should parents give cough and cold medicines to children over 4 years of age?

A: Cough and cold symptoms usually go away without treatment after a certain amount of time. Over-the-counter cough and cold medicines will not cure the common cold, but may give some temporary relief of symptoms. Parents should consult their child’s healthcare provider if they have any concerns or questions about giving their child a medication. Parents should always tell their child’s healthcare provider about all prescription and over-the-counter medicines they are giving their child.

Q: What should parents and doctors be careful of if they want to give cough and cold medicines to children over 4 years of age?

A: Always keep medications in original bottles or containers, with the cap secure, and up and away from children. Children getting into and taking medications without adult supervision can lead to serious and potentially life-threatening effects. Avoid giving more than one cough and cold medicine at a time to children. Two medicines may have different brand names but may contain the same ingredient. Some cough and cold medicines contain more than one active ingredient. Also, follow directions carefully to avoid giving too much medication; the right amount of medication often depends on your child’s age and weight.





Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Health Simplified

Health simplified. Click on this link to view a simple cost effective way to improve your health


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUaInS6HIGo&feature=youtube_gdata_player


Monday, August 22, 2011

After Hours Care

In the event you need medical care after normal business hours, Please contact our answering service at 834-4266. They will direct your call the the physician on call. In order to receive a return call you must allow your phone to accept blocked numbers. If your phone does not allow blocked number calls, you will not receive a call back.

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

Ten ways you can improve your health

1. If you smoke QUIT!
2. If you are overweight, lose weight. Know your BMI
3.Eat more fruits and vegetables
4.Walk 30 minutes or more each day. - do 3 ten minute walks
5.Visit your doctor regularly for preventative care
6.If you drink alcohol, drink in moderation
7.Wear your seatbelt and bike helmet
8.Use sunscreen
9.Get 7-8 hours sleep each night
10. Laugh!

Take responsibility for your own health.

visit www.cdc.gov for more healthy tips